Tips & Tricks

Safety Tips when using a Tow Rope

Most motorists will find themselves in a bit of a pickle at some point, and the chances are you will find yourself either on a the receiving end of a breakdown or called to the aid of somebody else. A tow rope is one of the many necessities for any driver, whether you are taking your vehicle on road or off road.

Click here to see our selection of tow ropes.

First and foremost, if you have breakdown cover, then this should always be your first port of call - most breakdown services will fix your car on the road and get you back up and running without hassle.

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LED Headlights: Why You Should Convert Today

LED Headlights are fast becoming the go-to replacement for Land Rover Defender owners all over the world. Once a more expensive luxury, LED Headlights are now an affordable and more cost-effective solution than some cheaper, less-effective bulbs.

Let's have a look at why you should switch to LED Headlights today.

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Differentials: A Technical Briefing

When equipping a vehicle to go off-road you soon realise that equipment designed to maintain forward motion falls into two categories.

The first is the 'get you out at all costs' group. This includes items such as powered winches, which can sometimes contribute to getting stuck in the first place, because of their high weight. Nevertheless they are very useful tools for getting yourself out of a problem. Other items in this group are aggressive, off-road-only, tyres, and kinetic recovery ropes. All these items are carried by people who are prepared to get stuck and be faced with the consequences — in other words, digging! Their chosen route is less likely to be dictated by suspect areas which
others might wish to avoid, particularly solo vehicles.

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The Benefits of Zinc Galvanisation on Land Rovers

The motor industry has tried all manner of coatings to protect vehicles against rust, with varying degrees of success. The relatively thin steel sections of car bodies mean that the ravages of water, grit and salt can soon wreak havoc on them.

An unprotected steel bumper which is rusting. Unprotected steel will always succumb to the corrosive effects of moisture.

Vehicles which don't have a separate chassis but rely on a monocoque body for their structural integrity can be destined for an early grave if not adequately rustproofed. The use of low technology surface coatings in the early years of monocoque production meant that most such cars were lucky to survive more than 10 years.

The introduction of the MoT test highlighted the problem, particularly when corrosion damage had been done around weight-bearing areas such as sills and suspension mountings. Not surprisingly, many companies sprang up during the 1960s and '70s offering a thorough rustproofing treatment, but the benefit of such products was sometimes questionable. Treating a new car might increase protection, but applying rustproofer to a used vehicle often only succeeded in masking existing corrosion and locking in already present moisture.

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High Lift Jack - 101 Uses

No one is really sure when the first high lift jack came into use, but it was certainly at least 100 years ago. What is commonly termed 'high lift' jack has also been known as the rail-road jack, implement jack, or farm jack. And for good reason, as every farm and smallholding has a use at some stage for one of these highly versatile tools.

The jacks are generally available in 4' or 5' versions and are manufactured in the United States by Bloomfield Manufacturing, who make the original High-Lift, or in Canada by the New—Form Manufacturing Co, who produce the distinctive orange Jackall version. There are also far eastern copies available in the UK but these are generally a poor quality alternative when compared to the other two mainstream producers.

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